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2 Nash for sale

If you cannot imagine your car without seat belts, the heating and the ventilation system, you need to thank Nash for inventing those life-saving facilities. The company was a pioneer in other automotive innovations - they introduced the unibody construction, bed-in-a-car feature and quad headlights. Nash were also the first to launch compact and muscle cars in the United States. The company was founded in 1916 by Charles W. Nash. They lost their autonomy becoming the division of the Nash-Kelvinator Corporation in 1937, and then the part of American Motors Corporation in 1954. Eventually production of Nash cars ceased in…
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2 Cars found
If you cannot imagine your car without seat belts, the heating and the ventilation system, you need to thank Nash for inventing those life-saving facilities. The company was a pioneer in other automotive innovations - they introduced the unibody construction, bed-in-a-car feature and quad headlights. Nash were also the first to launch compact and muscle cars in the United States. The company was founded in 1916 by Charles W. Nash. They lost their autonomy becoming the division of the Nash-Kelvinator Corporation in 1937, and then the part of American Motors Corporation in 1954. Eventually production of Nash cars ceased in 1957.

Nash aimed at producing reliable modern cars affordable for a wider audience to give the customer more than he paid for. There are various Nash car models which can catch attention of the American classic cars collectors. One of them is the first model manufactured under Charles Nash’s name, the 1917 Nash Model 671. Other Nash cars that may raise interest of the classic cars enthusiasts are the first Ajaxes from 1925 (later converted into the Nash Light Six), the 1928 Nash 400 Series with the innovative at that time two spark plugs per cylinder, the 1930 Nash Advanced Eight with twin plug ignition and overhead valves, the luxurious Nash Ambassador, the 1941 Nash 600 which was the first monocoque car in the United States, the bath-like designed 1949 Nash Ambassador Airflyte with the first windtunnel sculpted bodywork and its version from 1950 with optional lap-belt. The 50s were ripe with the innovative Nash cars: the 1950 Nash Rambler Custom Landau Convertible, the first American-built compact car, the 1951 Nash-Healey, the US’s first post-war sports car, and the cute Nash Metropolitan, the first car to be designed and marketed for women.